Brainsplatter

cynthialeu:

fuckyeahsirharder:

vastderp:

Being skeptical that another person can be incapacitated by a mental illness because you cope just fine with your problems is basically the same as saying “I don’t understand why other people’s brakes fail, because my car works great.”

I reblog this every time.

Good analogy.

(Source: vastderp-placeholder, via kassienipples)

whitegirlsaintshit:

shialabae:

brownglucose:

imsoshive:

She on beat like a muhhfucka

image

shoutout to her for being so positive while going through chemo

FUCK ME UP MARY BETH

GET IT BITCH!!!! YESSS!!!! FUCK IT UP I LOVE IT!!!!!

(via vaydaplacebosuicide)

vicemag:

There’s No Such Thing as a ‘Non-Lethal’ Weapon
Late last month, the spill of headlines calling out the Hong Kong authorities’ use of non-lethal weapons against democracy demonstrators gathered international attention and condemnation from NGOs like Human Rights Watch. For onlookers in the US, such news dovetailed with a St. Louis neighborhood’s standoff with riot police that spread 12 miles north, where yet another young black man was recently shot and killed by an off-duty officer.
From the 1960s Civil Rights movement to the Arab Spring, these events fall in line with a decades-long history of televised protests during which police weaponry has alarmed the media, activists, and the public. The use of non-lethal weapons on civilians (like the use of any type of weapon on anybody) is often the spark that leads to city streets devolving into war zones and the police beginning to act like an army. Deaths, accidental or otherwise, start to pile up.
But we should be clear about something: There’s really no such thing as a “non-lethal” weapon. A weapon’s lethality is, ultimately, not up to the object itself. Arguing otherwise is an attempt to shift one of our greatest moral responsibilities onto an inanimate object that has no agency.
Continue

vicemag:

There’s No Such Thing as a ‘Non-Lethal’ Weapon

Late last month, the spill of headlines calling out the Hong Kong authorities’ use of non-lethal weapons against democracy demonstrators gathered international attention and condemnation from NGOs like Human Rights Watch. For onlookers in the US, such news dovetailed with a St. Louis neighborhood’s standoff with riot police that spread 12 miles north, where yet another young black man was recently shot and killed by an off-duty officer.

From the 1960s Civil Rights movement to the Arab Spring, these events fall in line with a decades-long history of televised protests during which police weaponry has alarmed the media, activists, and the public. The use of non-lethal weapons on civilians (like the use of any type of weapon on anybody) is often the spark that leads to city streets devolving into war zones and the police beginning to act like an army. Deaths, accidental or otherwise, start to pile up.

But we should be clear about something: There’s really no such thing as a “non-lethal” weapon. A weapon’s lethality is, ultimately, not up to the object itself. Arguing otherwise is an attempt to shift one of our greatest moral responsibilities onto an inanimate object that has no agency.

Continue

(via vaydaplacebosuicide)

tentarude:

troncats:

sorry:

I read an article the other day that said, “if you drink every day you are an alcoholic.” Thank god I only drink every night

why do text posts these days sound like they are quotes from a 40 year old mother’s facebook

image

(Source: sorry, via vaydaplacebosuicide)